Social Accounts Sprite

Is the Areolar Breast Augmentation Incision Right for Me?

By Peter Fisher, MD on February 16, 2016


A woman with full breasts, wearing a braWomen who are unhappy with the appearance of their breasts may look to breast augmentation to help them achieve a more shapely bust line. Breast augmentation can transform the appearance of the breasts, adding volume and improving shape. There are many factors to consider when deciding to undergo breast augmentation, including incision type. Dr. Peter Fisher works with patients to determine which incision type is best for each patient's needs. To learn more about the areolar breast augmentation incision, contact our San Antonio, TX practice today.

How Is Breast Augmentation Performed Using an Areolar Incision?

Breast augmentation may be performed through different incision sites, including an areolar incision. Areolar incisions are ideal because the resulting scarring discreetly blends within the natural color difference between the areola and the breast tissue.

When the areolar incision technique is used, breasts implants are placed through incisions made around the areola. The surgeon will create an incision around a portion of the areola, the dark, circular tissue that surrounds the nipple. After the areolar incision is made, the breast implant may be placed either under or above the chest muscle and the incision will be sutured closed to complete treatment.

After surgery, patients require time to recover before returning to normal activities. Many patients feel well enough to return to work and resume their normal activities within a week of surgery. However, it typically takes at least six weeks for patients to fully recover. During the first few days of recovery, patients generally experience soreness within the chest muscles and breast tissue. As the body heals from surgery, any pain, swelling, and bruising should subside. If pain or swelling increases, it should be brought to your surgeon's attention immediately as it could be a sign of infection or other complication.   

Why Choose the Areolar Incision Technique for Breast Augmentation?

Many patients choose to undergo breast augmentation using the areolar incision for the advantages this technique offers, including:

  • Scarring is less noticeable: Scarring is less noticeable with an areolar incision because the incision is hidden where the areola and breast tissue meet, where the tissues are naturally different colors.
  • Allows implants to be placed in any plane: The areolar incision technique allows breast implants to be placed in any plane, including over the chest muscle, under the chest muscle, or partially under the chest muscle.
  • Allows greater control for implant placement: The areolar incision allows direct access to the breasts, allowing greater surgical control and better breast symmetry.

What Are the Disadvantages of the Areolar Incision Technique?

When undergoing any type of breast augmentation surgery, it's important to be aware of any potential risks and disadvantages. Some risks and disadvantages associated with the areolar incision technique include:

  • Loss of nipple sensation: Loss of nipple sensation can occur with an areolar incision. Loss of sensation may be temporary, or in rare cases, permanent.
  • Increased risk of infection: Areolar incisions have a slightly greater risk of infection because the breast implants must pass through the milk ducts, where bacteria naturally live. 

Is Breast Augmentation Right for You?

To find out if breast augmentation is right for you, we welcome you to schedule a consultation with Dr. Fisher today.

Related to This

desktop-only

Contact Our Practice

Dr. Fisher has been available to answer all of my questions and provide me with not only professional medical expertise, but also a much appreciated level of personal empathy. I would 100% recommend Dr. Fisher to anyone who is considering plastic surgery.

Brandi

X CLOSE

San Antonio Office

7950 Floyd Curl Dr
Ste 1009
San Antonio, TX 78229

Closed Today

X CLOSE

Contact Our Practice